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D

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DAFF, v. t. to take off; to put by,to turn aside with
slight and neglect
DAGONET, sub. a foolish knight at the court of
King Arthur
DANCING HORSE, a performing horse, belonging
to one Bankes, a Scotchman
DANGER, sub. power, control, according to some
debt
DARE, v. t. to terrify, make to couch; larks were
caught by small mirrors fastened on scarlet
cloth
DARRAIGN, v. t. to arrange, or put in order of
battle [Fr. arranger]
DASH, sub. a stigma
DAUBERY, sub. false pretence, cheating
DAY-BED, sub. a sofa,
DAY-WOMAN, sub. a dairy woman
DEAR, adj. dear was used for anything power-
fully though unpleasantly affecting the feel-
ings
DEATH-TOKENS, sub. plague spots
DECK, sub. a pack of cards; v. t. to cover, perhaps
to sprinkle
DECENT, adj. becoming
DEEDLESS, adj. inactive
DEEM, sub. a surmise, opinion
DEFEAT, v. t. to disguise
DEFEND, v. t. to forbid
DELIGHTED, adj, framed for delight; delightful
DEMERIT, sub. desert
DEMURING, pr. p. looking demure
DENIER, sub. a very small piece of money
DERACINATE, v. t. to eradicate, to root up [Fr.
deraciner]
BERN, adj. dreary, secret,
DESCENDING, sub. lineage
DESIGN, v. t. to point out, mention before
DEVEST, v. t. to undress
DEWBERRIES, sub. fruit of Rubus Cæsius, a large
kind of blackberry
DICH, v. i. do to, happen to
DIET, sub. regimen
DIETED, pt. p. bound strictly
DIFFUSE, v. t. to confuse
DIFFUSED, adj. wild, irregular
DISAPPOINTED, pt. p. unprepared
DISOANDY, v. t. to dissolve, to melt, to thaw,
DISCLOSE, v. t. to hatch; sub. the coming forth of the
chicken from the shell
DISCOVERER, sub. scout
DISEDGE, v. i. to surfeit
DISLIMN, v. i. to efface, blot
DISMES, sub. tenths [Fr. dismes]
DISPONGE, v. i. to pour down
DISPOSE, sub. disposition
DISTANCE, sub. hostility, alienation
DISVOUCH, v. t. to contradict
DIVE-DAPPER, sub. the dab-chick
DIVISION, sub. variation in music, modulation
DOCUMENT, sub. instruction
DOFF, v. t. to put off
DOWLAS, sub. coarse linen
DOWLE, sub. down, the soft plumage of a feather
DOWN-GYVED, adj. covering the ankles like fetters
DOWN-ROPING, adj. hanging down in glutinous
strings
DOWN SLEEVES, hanging sleeves
Doxy, sub. a mistress, a canting word [Comp.
Decker's 'Bellman of London']
DRAFF, sub. dregs, refuse
DRAUGHT, sub. a privy
DRAW DRY-FOOT, follow game by the scent
DRAWER, sub. a tapster
DRAWN, pt. p. quaffed
DRAWN FOX, a fox turned out of his earth,
DRIBBLING, adj. weakly shot
DROLLERY, sub. a puppet show; a humorous painting
DRUMBLE. v. i. to be sluggish
DRY-BEAT, v. t. to thrash, cudgel
DUDGEON, sub. the handle of a dagger
DUN, sub. name for a horse. 'To draw dun from
mire,' a rustic game played with a log of wood,
DUN'S THE MOUSE, a proverbial expression now
unintelligible,
DUP, v. t. to open
DURANCE, sub. prison dress. There seems a play
on another meaning of durance, which was a kind
of durable stuff.
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