William Shakespeare's plays, sonnets and poems at AbsoluteShakespeare.com
Home Plays Sonnets Poems Quotes Summaries Essays Glossary Links Help

HOME > Glossary > H

A B C D E F G H I J K L M N O P Q R S T U V W Y Z

H

Study Guides
Hamlet
Julius Caesar
King Henry IV
King Lear
Macbeth
Merchant of Venice
Othello
Romeo and Juliet
The Tempest
Twelfth Night

Trivia
Authorship
Bard Facts
Bibliography
Biography
FAQ
Films
Globe Theatre
Pictures
Quiz
Timeline

HABITUDE, sub. condition of body
HACK, v. i. to grow common
HAGGARD, sub. a wild hawk
HAIR, sub. nature, texture
HALF-CHECKED BIT, mutilated, of which only one
part remained
HALL, interj. a hall! a cry to make room for
dancers
HAND-FAST, sub. a contract, betrothal; custody
HANDY-DANDY, a game in which an object is
passed from one to another,
HANGMAN BOYS, young rascals
HAPPELY, or HAPPILY} adv. perchance
HARDIMENTS, sub. feats of arms and valour
HARLOT, adj. base (harlot king)
HARLOTRY, sub. a harlot; a silly wench
HARROW, v. t. to disquiet, to distract
HARRY, v. t. to vex, to harry
HATCH, sub. a half door
HAUGHT, adj. haughty
HAUNCH, sub. the rear, latter end
HAVOC, interj. to cry 'havoc!' signifies to give no
quarter
HAWKING, adj. hawk-like
HAY, sub. a circular dance;an exclamation used
by a fencer when he hits his adversary [It. hai!
'You have it!']
HEAD, sub. an armed force; source
HEAD-LUGGED, part. adj. dragged by the ears,
savage
HEAP, sub. company of persons
HEARTED, pt.p. placed or rooted in the heart
HEAT, v. t. to run over, traverse
HEAVES, sub. deep sighs
HEBONA, sub. a word of doubtful meaning; the
yew, ebony, and henbane have all been suggest-
ed [Fr. hebenon]
HECTIC, sub. a fever
HEDGE, v. i. to skulk
HEDGE-PRIEST, sub. clergyman of the lowest
order
HEEL, v. t. to dance
HEFTS, sub. heavings
HELM, v. t. to steer
HELPLESS, adj. incurable; useless, unprofitable
HENCHMAN, sub. a page
HENT, v. t. to seize, take; sub. hold, seizure
HERBLETS, sub. small herbs
HERB OF GRACE, rue
HERCULES AND HIS LOAD, the Globe theatre, from
its sign
HERMIT, sub. a beadsman
HESTS, sub. commands
HEWGH, sub. a sound to represent the whizzing
of an arrow
HIDE FOX, AND ALL AFTER, the game of hide and
seek
HIGH AND LOW, kinds of false dice
HIGH-BATTLED, adj. at the head of a victorious
army
HIGH-DAY, adj. holiday
HIGH LONE, adj. alone, on one's own feet, a term
of the nursery
HIGHT, pt. p. is called
HIGH-VICED, adj. conspicuously wicked
HILDING, sub. a menial; adj. base
HIP. TO CATCH ON, have in one's power; a wrest-
ling or hunting phrase
HIPPED, pt.p. hurt in the hips
HIREN, sub. Irene, name of the heroine in a lost
drama by Pecle
HIT TOGETHER, v. agree or act together
HIVE, sub. a kind of bonnet
HOAR, v. t. to make white, as with leprosy
HOBBY-HORSE, sub. a principal part in the morris-
dance; a light woman
HODGE-PUDDING, sub. perhaps a haggis
HOLDING, sub. a burthen of a song; congruity, sense
HOLIDAME, sub. halidom, holiness,
HOLY-ALES, sub. rural festivals
HONEYING, pr. p. fondling
HONEY-STALKS, sub. clover
HOODMAN, sub. the person blinded in the game of
blind man's buff
HOODMAN-BLIND, sub. blind man's buff,
HORN-MAD, adj. mad like a savage bull [quibbling]
HOROLOGE, sub. a clock
HOST, v. i. to lodge
HOT AT HAND, not to be held in,
H0T-HOUSE, sub. a bagnio
HOX, v. t. to hough, to hamstring
HOY, sub. a small coasting vessel
HUGGER-MIGGER, IN, secretly, with hurried se-
crecy
HULL, v. i. to float
HULLING, pr. p. floating at the mercy of the
waves
HUNT, sub. game killed in the chase
HUNTS-UP, sub. tunes to arouse the huntsman
HURLY, and HURLY-BURLY, sub. tumult, uproar
HURRICANO, sub. waterspout
HURTLESS, adj. harmless
HURTLING, sub. a clashing noise
HURTLE, v. i. to come together with noise
HUSBANDRY, sub. management,
HYEN, sub. an hyæna
< PREVIOUS
Copyright 2000-2005 AbsoluteShakespeare.com. All rights reserved.  Contact Us  Privacy  Awards