William Shakespeare's Third Part of King Henry the Sixth in the complete original text.
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Third Part of King Henry the Sixth

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Act V. Scene V.

Scene V.—Another Part of the Same.

Alarums: Excursions: and afterwards a re-
treat. Then enter KING EDWARD,
CLARENCE, GLOUCESTER, and Forces;
with QUEEN MARGARET, OXFORD, and
SOMERSET prisoners.

K. Edw. Now, here a period of tumultuous
broils.
Away with Oxford to Hames Castle straight:
For Somerset, off with his guilty head.
Go, bear them hence; I will not hear them speak.
Oxf. For my part, I'll not trouble thee with
words.
Som. Nor I, but stoop with patience to my
fortune.
[Exeunt OXFORD and SOMERSET, guarded.
Q. Mar. So part we sadly in this troublous
world,
To meet with joy in sweet Jerusalem.
K. Edw. Is proclamation made, that who
finds Edward
Shall have a high reward, and he his life?
Glo. It is: and lo, where youthful Edward
comes.

Enter Soldiers, with PRINCE EDWARD.
K. Edw. Bring forth the gallant: let us hear
him speak.
What! can so young a thorn begin to prick?
Edward, what satisfaction canst thou make,
for bearing arms, for stirring up my subjects,
And all the trouble thou hast turn'd me to?
prince. Speak like a subject, proud am-
bitious York!
Suppose that I am now my father's mouth:
Resign thy chair, and where I stand kneel thou,
Whilst I propose the self-same words to thee,
Which, traitor, thou wouldst have me answer to.
Q. Mar. Ah! that thy father had been so
resolv'd.
Glo. That you might still have worn the
petticoat,
And ne'er have stol'n the breech from Lan-
caster.
Prince. Let Æsop fable in a winter's night;
His currish riddles sort not with this place.
Glo. By heaven, brat, I'll plague you for that
word.
Q. Mar. Ay, thou wast born to be a plague
to men.
Glo. For God's sake, take away this captive
scold.
Prince. Nay, take away this scolding crook-
back rather.
K. Edw. Peace, wilful boy, or I will charm
your tongue.
Clar. Untutor'd lad, thou art too malapert.
Prince. I know my duty; you are all
undutiful:
Lascivious Edward, and thou perjur'd George,
And thou mis-shapen Dick, I tell ye all,
I am your better, traitors as ye are;
And thou usurp'st my father's right and mine.
K. Edw. Take that, the likeness of this railer
here. [Stabs him.
Glo. Sprawl'st thou? take that, to end thy
agony. [Stabs him.
Clar. And there's for twitting me with per-
jury. [Stabs him.
Q. Mar. O, kill me too!
Glo. Marry, and shall. [Offers to kill her.
K. Edw. Hold, Richard, hold! for we have
done too much.
Glo. Why should she live, to fill the world
with words?
K. Edw. What! doth she swoon? use means
for her recovery.
Glo. Clarence, excuse me to the king, my
brother;
I'll hence to London on a serious matter:
Ere ye come there, be sure to hear some news.
Clar. What? what?
Glo. The Tower! the Tower! [Exit.
Q. Mar. O Ned, sweet Ned! speak to thy
mother, boy!
Canst thou not speak? O traitors! mur-
derers!
They that stabb'd Cæsar shed no blood at all,
Did not offend, nor were not worthy blame,
If this foul deed were by, to equal it:
He was a man; this, in respect, a child;
And men ne'er spend their fury on a child.
What's worse than murderer, that I may name
it?
No, no, my heart will burst, an if I speak:
And I will speak, that so my heart may burst.
Butchers and villains! bloody cannibals!
How sweet a plant have you untimely cropp'd!
You have no children, butchers! if you had,
The thought of them would have stirr'd up
remorse:
But if you ever chance to have a child,
Look in his youth to have him so cut off
As, deathsmen, you have rid this sweet young
prince!
K. Edw. Away with her! go, bear her hence
perforce.
Q. Mar. Nay, never bear me hence, dispatch
me here:
Here sheathe thy sword, I'll pardon thee my
death.
What! wilt thou not? then, Clarence, do it
thou.
Clar. By heaven, I will not do thee so much
ease.
Q. Mar. Good Clarence, do; sweet Clarence,
do thou do it.
Clar. Didst thou not hear me swear I would
not do it?
Q. Mar. Ay, but thou usest to forswear thy-
self:
'Twas sin before, but now 'tis charity.
What! wilt thou not? Where is that devil's
butcher,
Hard-favour'd Richard? Richard, where art
thou?
Thou art not here: murder is thy alms-deed;
Petitioners for blood thou ne'er put'st back.
K. Edw. Away, I say! I charge ye, bear her
hence.
Q. Mar. So come to you and yours, as to this
prince! [Exit, led out forcibly.
K. Edw. Where's Richard gone?
Clar. To London, all in post; and, as I
guess,
To make a bloody supper in the Tower.
K. Edw. He's sudden if a thing comes in
his head.
Now march we hence: discharge the common
sort
With pay and thanks, and let's away to London
And see our gentle queen how well she fares;
By this, I hope, she hath a son for me. [Exeunt.
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