William Shakespeare's The Merchant of Venice, famous for the lines, "prick us do we not laugh, wrong us will we not avenge", tells the story of love, honour and justice.
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HOME > Plays > The Merchant of Venice > Act II. Scene III.

The Merchant of Venice

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Act II. Scene III.

Scene III.—The Same. A Room in
SHYLOCK'S House.

Enter JESSICA and LAUNCELOT.

Jes. I am sorry thou wilt leave my father so:
Our house is hell, and thou, a merry devil,
Didst rob it of some taste of tediousness.
But fare thee well; there is a ducat for thee:
And, Launcelot, soon at supper shalt thou see
Lorenzo, who is thy new master's guest:
Give him this letter; do it secretly;
And so farewell: I would not have my father
See me in talk with thee.
Laun. Adieu! tears exhibit my tongue. Most
beautiful pagan, most sweet Jew! If a Christian
do not play the knave and get thee, I am much
deceived. But, adieu! these foolish drops do
somewhat drown my manly spirit: adieu!
Jes. Farewell, good Launcelot.
[Exit LAUNCELOT.
Alack, what heinous sin is it in me
To be asham'd to be my father's child!
But though I am a daughter to his blood,
I am not to his manners. O Lorenzo!
If thou keep promise, I shall end tins strife,
Become a Christian, and thy loving wife. [Exit.
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