William Shakespeare's King Lear teaches the lesson to never believe everything you hear.
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King Lear

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Act IV. Scene IV.

Scene IV.—The Same. A Tent.

Enter with drum and colours, CORDELIA, Doctor,
and Soldiers.

Cor. Alack! 'tis he: why, he was met even
now
As mad as the vex'd sea; singing aloud;
Crown'd with rank fumiter and furrow weeds,
With burdocks, hemlock, nettles, cuckoo-flowers,
Darnel, and all the idle weeds that grow
In our sustaining corn. A century send forth;
Search every acre in the high-grown field,
And bring him to our eye. [Exit an Officer.
What can man's wisdom
In the restoring his bereaved sense?
He that helps him take all my outward worth.
Phy. There is means, madam;
Our foster-nurse of nature is repose,
The which he lacks; that to provoke in him,
Are many simples operative, whose power
Will close the eye of anguish.
Cor. All bless'd secrets,
All you unpublish'd virtues of the earth,
Spring with my tears! be aidant and remediate
In the good man's distress! Seek, seek for
him,
Lest his ungovem'd rage dissolve the life
That wants the means to lead it.

Enter a Messenger.
Mess. News, madam;
The British powers are marching hitherward.
Cor. 'Tis known before; our preparation
stands
In expectation of them. O dear father!
It is thy business that I go about;
Therefore great France
My mourning and important tears hath pitied.
No blown ambition doth our arms incite,
But love, dear love, and our aged father's right,
Soon may I hear and see him! [Exeunt.
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