William Shakespeare's Julius Caesar is the story of ambition, power and conspiracy.
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Julius Csar

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Act II. Scene III.

Scene III.—The Same. A Street near
the Capitol.

Enter ARTEMIDORUS, reading a paper.

Art. Cæsar, beware of Brutus; take heed of
Cassius; come not near Casca; have an eye to
Cinna; trust not Trebonius; mark well Metel-
lus Cimber; Decius Brutus loves thee not; thou
hast wronged Caius Ligarius. There is but one
mind in all these men, and it is bent against
Cæsar. If thou be'st not immortal, look about
you: security gives way to conspiracy. The
mighty gods defend thee! Thy lover,
ARTEMIDORUS.
Here will I stand till Cæsar pass along,
And as a suitor will I give him this.
My heart laments that virtue cannot live
Out of the teeth of emulation.
If thou read this, O Cæsar! thou mayst live;
If not, the Fates with traitors do contrive. [Exit.
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